Martha Lampland

Associate Professor

Curriculum Vitae

Martha Lampland is Associate Professor of Sociology and Faculty Director of the Science Studies Program at the University of California, San Diego.  She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago in 1987.  She has been a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, a Fulbright Teaching Fellow at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, and a Research Fellow at the Humanities Research Institute at the University of California, Irvine.  Professor Lampland has also been a managing editor of theJournal of Historical Sociology (1996-2002). 

Professor Lampland has published and co-edited several books: The Object of Labor. Commodification in Socialist Hungary  (University of Chicago Press, 1995); Altering States.  Ethnographies of the Transition in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, co-edited with Daphne Berdahl and Matti Bunzl (University of Michigan Press, 2000); and Standards and their Stories. How Quantifying, Classifying and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life  (Cornell University Press, forthcoming).  Her research interests include political economy, social and cultural history in Central Europe (19th-20th c.), and science studies.  She has published articles on women’s labor in socialism, the role of agrarian elites in Hungary’s decollectivization, gender and the nation in 19th c. Hungary, historical consciousness, revolution, and poetry (1848-1956), theories of instinct and class formation in the 1930s and 1950s in Hungary, and state planning in mid-20th c. Hungary.  She has just finished a book on agrarian work science and the development of socialist wages during the transition to Stalinism (1920-1956), entitled The Value of Labor. The Science of Commodification (under review by the University of Chicago Press).  Current projects include a study of political iconography in satirical magazines in Hungary (1935-1948), and an investigation into alternative currencies during post-war inflationary cycles in Hungary.  She has also written a paper with Maya Nadkarni on the death of political jokes in postsocialist Hungary. 

I am engaged in a study of work science, agricultural productivity and wages in Hungary (1920-1956), studying in particular the rise of economic policies advocating scientifically calibrated wage forms in the 1920s and 1930s, and the influence of these policies on the development and implementation of Stalinist cooperative agriculture in the 1950s.

Two intersecting agendas underlie this project:

**writing a post-Cold War history of the transition from capitalism to socialism in Hungary , with a particular attention to both the continuities and discontinuities in economic theories and expert personnel between the two regimes.

**focusing the analytic strengths of science studies on the study of 20th c. social policy, state formation and labor politics.

Archival research constitutes the primary materials used in the analysis. For the 1920s and 1930s, scholarly and popular publications (journals, pamphlets and newspapers) are studied. From 1945, these materials are augmented with extensive use of government and party documents, from the national and county level. In addition, interviews were conducted with a number of economists and policy-makers who were directly involved in creating a new socialist agriculture.

BOOKS

2009    Standards and their Stories. How Quantifying, Classifying and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life.  co-edited with Susan Leigh Star.  Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

2000    Altering States: Ethnographies of Transition in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union.  co-edited with Daphne Berdahl and Matti Bunzl.  Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. 

1995    The Object of Labor: Commodification in Socialist Hungary.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

BOOKS  IN PROGRESS

The Value of Labor: The Science of Commodification (Hungary, 1920-1956)
(under review at the University of Chicago Press)          

ARTICLES and BOOK CHAPTERS

2011    The Technopolitical Lineage of State Planning in Mid-Century Hungary (1930-1956) INEntangled Geographies. Empire and Technopolitics in the Global Cold WarGabrielle Hecht, ed. Pp. 155-184. Cambridge: MIT Press.

2010       False Numbers as Formalizing Practices.  Social Studies of Science 40(3):377-404.

2009      Classifying Laborers: Instinct, Property, and the Psychology of Productivity in Hungary (1920-1956) IN Standards and their Stories. How Quantifying, Classifying and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life, Martha Lampland and Susan Leigh Star, eds. pp. 123-142.  Ithaca: Cornell.  with S.L. Star

2009    Reckoning with Standards IN Standards and their Stories. How Quantifying, Classifying and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life, Martha Lampland and Susan Leigh Star, eds. pp. 3-24.  Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

2002    The Advantages of Being Collectivized: cooperative farm managers in the postsocialist economy IN Postsocialism: Ideas, Ideologies, and Practices in Europe and Asia, Chris Hann (ed.) pp. 72-123.  London: Routledge.

2000    Afterword IN Altering States: Ethnographies of Transition in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.  Daphne Berdahl, Matti Bunzl and Martha Lampland, editors.  pp. 209-281. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

1998 Corvée, Maps and Contracts: Agricultural Policy and the Rise of the Modern State in Hungary during the 19th Century. Irish Journal of Anthropology 3:7-40.

1997a  Farmers in the Post-Cooperative Economy.  Paper written for the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research. 

1997b  The Social Constraints on Economic Transitions.  State Wage Policy in the Transition to Stalinism.  Paper  written for the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research.

1994a  Feminizmus és Társadalomkutatás [Feminism and Social Research] IN Férfiuralom.  Irások nökröl, férfiakról, feminizmusról  [Male Domination.  Writings on women, men and on feminism].  Miklós Hadas, ed.  pp. 55-62.  Budapest: Replika Kör.

1994b Family Portraits: Gendered Images of the Nation in 19th Century Hungary . Eastern European Politics and Society 8(2):287-316.

1994c  Családi Portrék: Nemi Szerepekben Megfogalmazott Nemzetkoncepciók a Tizenkilencedik Századi Magyarországon.  [Family Portraits: Gendered Images of the Nation in 19th Century, abridged version].  Cafe Babel 11(1-2):119-129. 

1993    Death of a Hero.  Hungarian National Identity and the Funeral of Lajos Kossuth.  Hungarian Studies 8(1):29-35.

1991 Pigs, Party Secretaries and Private Lives. American Ethnologist 18(3):459-479.

1990    The Politics of History: Historical Consciousness of 1847-1849.  Hungarian Studies 6(2):185-194.

1990    Unthinkable Subjects: Women and Labor in Socialist Hungary.  East European Quarterly 4:389-398.

1989    Biographies of Liberation: Testimonials to Labor in Socialist Hungary IN Promissory Notes: Women in the Transition to Socialism, Sonia Kruks, Rayna Rapp and Marilyn Young (ed.), pp. 306-322. New York: Monthly Review Press.

Fall 2015

SOCI 30: Science, Technology, and Society

Winter 2016

SOCI 168E: Sociology of Science

SOCG 234: Intellectual Foundations of the Study of Science, Technology and Medicine