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David FitzGerald

Professor, Gildred Chair in U.S.-Mexican Relations and Co-Director, Center for Comparative Immigration Studies

Curriculum Vitae

"Refuge Beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers," (Oxford University Press, 2019)

  • ASA International Migration Section Best Book Award, 2020
  • CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title, 2019

"Remote control of migration: theorising territoriality, shared coercion, and deterrence", Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 2020.

The Sociology of Refugee Migration,” (with Rawan Arar), Annual Review of Sociology, 2018.

"Can you become one of us? A historical comparison of legal selection of 'assimilable' immigrants in Europe and the Americas" (with David Cook-Martín, Angela S. García and Rawan Arar). Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 2017.

The History of Racialized Citizenship.” Pp. 129-52 in The Oxford Handbook of Citizenship, edited by Rainer Bauböck, Ayelet Shachar, Irene Bloemraad, Maarten Vink. New York: Oxford University Press. 2017.

150 Years of Transborder Politics: Mexico and Mexicans Abroad, in A Century of Transnationalism: Immigrants and Their Homeland Connections, edited by Nancy L. Green and Roger Waldinger. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2016.

Culling the Masses: The Democratic Origins of Racist Immigration Policy in the Americas (Harvard University Press 2014)

  • ASA Distinguished Scholarly Book Award, 2017
  • Midwest Sociological Society Distinguished Book Award, 2017
  • APSA Migration and Citizenship Section Best Book Award, 2015
  • ASA Political Sociology Section Best Book Award, 2015
  • ASA International Migration Section Best Book Award, 2015
  • Honorable Mention, Theodore Saloutos Book Prize, Immigration and Ethnic History Society, 2015

A Nation of Emigrants: How Mexico Manages Its Migration (University of California Press 2014). Spanish-language version at Nación de Emigrantes.

“Culling the Masses: A Rejoinder” (with David Cook-Martín) Ethnic and Racial Studies 38(8). 2015

Emigration’s Impacts on Mexico: A Sociology of Dissimilation in How Immigrants Impact their Homelands, edited by Susan Eva Eckstein and Adil Najam. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013.

Migration: Policies and Politics” (with Rafael Alarcón) in Mexico and the United States: The Politics of Partnership, edited by Peter H. Smith and Andrew Selee. Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2013.

A Comparativist Manifesto for International Migration Studies, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2012.

Citizenship à la Carte: Emigration and the Strengthening of the Sovereign State in Politics from Afar: Transnational Diasporas and Networks, edited by Peter Mandaville and Terrence Lyons, Columbia University Press, 2012.

Mexican Migration and the Law, in Beyond the Border: The History of Mexico-US Migration, edited by Mark Overmyer-Velázquez, pp.179-203. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2011.

Liberalism and the Limits of Inclusion: Racialized Preferences in Immigration Laws of the Americas, 1850-2000. (with David Cook-Martín), Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 16(1): 7-25. 2010.

Colonies of the Little Motherland: Membership, Space, and Time in Mexican Migrant Hometown Associations, Comparative Studies in Society and History 50(1). 2008.

Mexican Assimilation: A Temporal and Spatial Reorientation (with Tomás Jiménez),W.E.B. Du Bois Review 4(2): 337-354. 2007.

Inside the Sending State: The Politics of Mexican Emigration Control, International Migration Review 40(2): 259-93. 2006.

Towards a Theoretical Ethnography of Migration, Qualitative Sociology 29(1): 1-24. 2006.

Rethinking Emigrant Citizenship, New York University Law Review 81(1): 90-116. 2006.

Nationality and Migration in Modern Mexico, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 31(1):171-91. 2005.

Transnationalism in Question (with Roger Waldinger), American Journal of Sociology 109(5):1177-95. 2004.

Beyond ‘Transnationalism’: Mexican Hometown Politics at an American Labor Union, Ethnic and Racial Studies 27(2): 228-47. 2004.